C++..how much time?

Hey,i am new to c++.Although i took it in 10+2 and in first year of my college,but it didn’t interested me.But now,it had been kinda like i cannot live without it…but the problem is that i had to do it all alone…any good book???practice …and what shall i do…i have done all that basic stuff already…just i get few hatchbacks after linked list stuff…??

Go through topcoder tutorials. Try out problems on spoj. Just order them according to number of users solved and you should get some idea. You don’t really need to go through books, you will learn as you solve problems. That is how I did.

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I agree with @pratikmoona. Best teacher is practice, you remember things the most when you use them when solving some problem (in job or in contest, but contests are more challenging - comparing to my job). And when there is some problem you do not know how to solve, you will learn something new and next time you will solve it :wink: You have to be patient and work hard. The best coders around the world solved thousands of problems.

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I totally agree with @pratikmoona but even after that I you want one then I would suggest you to go for Herbert Schildt’s The Complete Reference on C++. All the best.

The level of C++ you need to know for programming competitions is very small. C++ is designed for professional team programming of enormous high performance codebases. If your goal is just to use C++ as your competitive programming language than any of the beginners online courses will be sufficient. (The challenge in a programming competition is an algorithm problem not a design/engineering problem.)

If you want a job writing C++ components professionally than I would recommend working through the C++ standard:

http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2012/n3337.pdf

This is the definitive definition of the C++ language and C++ standard library. It will teach you, for example, how to determine whether the value category of an expression is a prvalue, xvalue or lvalue and what the reference collapsing rules are. It will show you how to generate a normally distributed value from the mersenne twister algorithm in two lines of standard library code. etc.

The level of C++ you need to know for programming competitions is very small. C++ is designed for professional team programming of enormous high performance codebases. If your goal is just to use C++ as your competitive programming language than any of the beginners online courses will be sufficient. (The challenge in a programming competition is an algorithm problem not a design/engineering problem.)

If you want a job writing C++ components professionally than I would recommend working through the C++ standard:

http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2012/n3337.pdf

This is the definitive definition of the C++ language and C++ standard library. It will teach you, for example, how to determine whether the value category of an expression is a prvalue, xvalue or lvalue and what the reference collapsing rules are. It will show you how to generate a normally distributed value from the mersenne twister algorithm in two lines of standard library code. etc.

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